PEER - Clinical trial • Breast Cancer Foundation NZ

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PEER

Recruiting
Updated: June 30, 2020

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a structured peer support program can improve exercise adherence and health outcomes in breast cancer survivors.

The purpose of this study is to test if peer support helps help improve women’s mental and physical health after breast cancer treatments compared to not receiving any messages.

Who is it for?

You may be eligible for this study if you are an adult with confirmed breast cancer, and are at least one month post-treatment completion for cancer.

Study details

All participants will undertake an initial four-week supervised training phase, with three sessions per week of exercise with an accredited exercise physiologist or equivalent. Following the supervised phase, participants will enter a one-year maintenance period where they will be asked to maintain 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity or a combination, therefore meeting the Australian exercise oncology guidelines. Participants will be randomly assigned to either receive peer support or no peer support during the maintenance phase.

It is hoped that this research will help determine if a peer support program is effective in enhancing exercise adherence and long-term health outcomes in cancer survivors.

For full trial information

Australia

Brisbane

Contact:

Chloe Salisbury

If you think you might be a candidate for this trial, use the contact details supplied, or talk to your doctor.

Want to access a trial that's not in your area? It's not always possible, but if you're interested, email us at intouch@bcf.org.nz

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