Mepitel film vs StrataXRT gel in managing radiation-induced skin reactions - Clinical trial • Breast Cancer Foundation NZ

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Mepitel film vs StrataXRT gel in managing radiation-induced skin reactions

Recruiting
Updated: July 8, 2021

This study will compare if StrataXRT gel is adequate compared with Mepitel film in decreasing the number of women who develop radiation-induced skin reactions during or immediately after radiation for breast cancer.

Radiation-induced skin reactions (like moist desquamation) occur in 80-90% of breast cancer patients by completion of treatment and can severely affect patient comfort levels.

Using Mepitel film on the irradiated skin significantly decreases skin reaction severity by creating a moist healing environment and preventing friction between damaged skin and clothing or other body parts of the irradiated skin. This allows for repair of the fragile skin rather than exacerbating the damage. One of the negative aspects of Mepitel film is that it needs to be applied very carefully by a radiation therapist or an oncology nurse once a week or more often in some patients, which takes up valuable staff resources.

StrataXRT gel is a silicone gel product that forms a thin silicone film when rubbed onto the skin, presumably with similar protective properties. Gel is applied by the patients themselves twice a day, requiring fewer hospital resources.

Who is it for?

All women aged 18 years and over receiving radiation for breast cancer after having had a mastectomy are eligible for this trial.

Study details

The part of the chest wall to be irradiated will be divided into two equal halves. One half will be randomized to Mepitel Film and the other half will be randomized to StrataXRT. 

  • Mepitel film will be applied by the radiation therapist once a week from day one of radiation therapy until four weeks after completion of treatment or until moist desquamation occurs, whichever comes first. 
  • StrataXRT gel will be applied by the patient twice a day from day one of radiation therapy until four weeks after completion of treatment or until moist desquamation occurs, whichever comes first. 

Full trial details

New Zealand

Christchurch Hospital
Palmerston North Hospital
St George's Hospital

Contact:

Patries Herst

If you think you might be a candidate for this trial, use the contact details supplied, or talk to your doctor.

Want to access a trial that's not in your area? It's not always possible, but if you're interested, email us at intouch@bcf.org.nz

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